New Year, New you

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Cayla Ames--The new year brings a time of re-evaluation and list-making.

Resolutions are a typical outcome of celebrating the New Year and as many have experienced already, so is breaking them.

Anyone who has made the decision to stop eating candy, give up coffee, exercise more, work less, spend more time with the family or spend less time at school knows how difficult it is to establish these habits.

A new trend is emerging among California Baptist University students to avoid the disappointment and simply not make a resolution to begin with.

Ashley McFarland, senior and communications major, has taken part in this trend, whether knowingly or unknowingly.

“No New Years resolutions for me this year,” McFarland said. “I always make them and then I always break them, so I decided this year that I would never even make any to begin with! It’s working out pretty well so far!”

Even a short clip shown in chapel demonstrated the lack of participation in the typical New Year custom, showing a great spectrum of people who simply did not make one. Faculty and students alike showed their great disinterest in setting aside Jan. 1 as their day to start fresh.

“I usually find that if I make one, I end up forgetting what it is not even a month later,” said senior Faith Holley, a music education major.

Some still hold to the age-old tradition, and see the New Year as an opportunity and an excuse to come clean.

“No candy, soda or coffee this year,” Hanna Wilhelm, junior and business administration major, said. “So far, so good.”

Those who have made resolutions fight the ancient battle of will, self-control, memory and concentration. Plenty of motives to change lifestyles and habits exist but for most people the will to do it runs out of stamina.

“At first, I would pick up a piece of candy and almost put it in my mouth, but then I’d realize what I was doing. I just remind myself not to eat those things by asking myself if they will benefit me,” said Wilhelm.

Though the desired result of making a New Years resolution is a positive one, most CBU students still are not joining in.

Most students wondered what the point was in making a resolution on just one day a year and not every day of the year.

“I say, why only make resolutions at the beginning of the year? Why not every day? Resolve every day to be happier, eat better, read the Bible more and be more of the person you want to be. That way you will never forget,” Holley said.

Whether a resolution has been made, kept, broken or not even thought of, making this New Year the best it can be is a goal suited for anyone.

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