What drives job satisfaction?

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College is a time when students not only learn about their future careers and prepare themselves but work at the same time. They learn about what the future could possibly be like for them once their careers kick off.

Working while in school makes sense to some students. College life is not cheap; food, gas and fun activities add up. In order to make money while adding job experiences to their resumes, students take advantage of job opportunities.

Being in school and working at the same time is no easy task. Going to class, completing the required homework and studying, and going to work and earning a pay is tiresome and can take its toll on them.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of recently enrolled college students, 32 percent were a part of the work force. If that statistic carries over, that means one out of every three students holds an outside job.

How can both success in the workplace and at school be attained?

Jessica Pitzek, freshman, works for both Michael’s craft store and Panda Express while attending school full time, hoping to go to medical school after graduation.

“I’m working for God, not myself,” Pitzek said. “It’s about making the customers happy and putting smiles on their faces.”

By working on a goal outside of class, there is the possibility of pushing away selfish motivations.

School and job performance can greatly increase through these goals, which in turn leave bosses and professors impressed with their work ethic.

Job satisfaction in the work place is key. Doing an impressive job means they earned their money, but it secures their position and gives room for advancement.

The careers students study for are similar, starting out in an entry-level position does not mean that you have to stay there. With hard work and application, anything is possible.

However, in order to move up the ranks, students must leave positive first impressions.

“It’s about meeting the expectations of your boss,” Jackson Brown, sophomore, said. “My boss has several expectations of me in both the quality and quantity of my work. My expectations need to match that.”

If students learn to attain the proper work ethic before they graduate, they can increase their chances of not only landing a good job but making sure they excel while learning to love it.

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