Scientific methods lead to year’s food trends, preparation

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Cake-pops, bacon and infused pasta were all the rage with food trends in 2012, but this year, food trends are getting a flavor boost and going back to basics.

Savory is one word to describe the food trends for the year to come. Executive chef of over 15 years and expert on fine dining, Jason Rios gave examples of just what the savory foods will be.

“Seasonal veggies, hearty rich sauces and even savory infused drinks are going to be big this year,” Rios said.

It takes interviewing a chef to know that food trends are not just limited to particular foods, but trends also include the way they are prepared. One way that this year’s food choices will taste different is in the way they are prepared.

One such preparation technique is sous-vide, a French term meaning “under vacuum.” This technique helps cook food more evenly, while ensuring food stays as moist as possible while cooking. Thanksgiving may be a place this technique is seen: Grandma may use a plastic bag to cook the turkey.

Who knew science was part of trends? Well, turns out there are many ways to prepare and marinate food.

Another food trend is molecular gastronomy, a scientific way of infusing foods. This particular food trend technique uses sodium chloride to do so.

If those techniques make one feel less like a “foodie” or amateur chef and more like a scientist with a beaker and lab coat, do not worry, the rest of 2013’s food trends are more mouthwatering than educational.

Rios also said vegetables and vegetarian dishes are the new stars of entrée line-ups this year. As more restaurants are incorporating organic foods and seasonal items to their menus to keep prices lower for higher quality, they are moving away from main meat dishes.

This could be more than just a trend in the future, as the price of food increases each year, especially the price of meat choices.

More partial to appetizers? 2013 will be a treat for appetizer lovers. Appetizers are becoming more popular in restaurants, and chefs are taking notice, delivering smaller dishes packed with even more flavor to delight those out to dinner.

Each year, it seems that a new twist on classic ethnic cuisines are fused together. In the food world, this is known as “fusion.” For French cuisine conesours, the forecast for this year shows American-French fusion is on the menu.

A food trends article would not be complete without a pasta option. Risotto gets fancy this year. Restaurant-goers will find all types of risottos on the menu, likely incorporated with many vegetables or gelatin-like sauces for a new mouthwatering experience.

Regardless of the food trend that has the masses flocking to restaurants, remember that trying new flavors and dishes is as much part of science sometimes as it is a taste experiment.

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