Ethics tested with lip synching

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Beyoncé, the former lead singer of Destiny’s Child, has many fans worldwide. The real question is: Does she still have her fans?
The singer graced the stage Jan. 21 for the 2013 Presidential Inauguration to sing the national anthem — kind of.

The singer known for hits such as, “Single Ladies,” “Halo” and “Who runs the world,” lip-synced the national anthem. For a week after the event, her fans and the public talked about her mistake on TV, the Internet and on campuses nationwide.

“It was made into a really big deal, all these other things are going on in the world and people are focusing on Beyoncé lip-syncing,” said Nathan McCoy, junior graphic design and digital media major and a Beyoncé fan.

McCoy expressed his disappointment in her lip-syncing, however he said, “It’s disappointing, you lose respect from your peers and fans when you do something like that.”

Some students responded differently, giving Beyoncé more leniency for her decision to lip-sync.

Katie Kopitzke, senior music education major, who is involved in California Baptist University’s university choir and orchestra, can relate to the pressure of performing live in front of an audience.

“We sing every Sunday (and) if you’re off a little it throws people off; you only have one shot,” Kopitzke said. “I know she is good live. That’s how you know if people are good, if they can sing well live.”

A week after the inauguration, Beyoncé apologized and even sang the national anthem live at her press conference in hopes of redeeming herself.

“She works really hard and that was the problem,” McCoy said.

So why did it take her a whole week to admit to her blunder?

“She might have been embarrassed about it,” said Marielle Sedin, sophomore communication studies major. “At an event that big, she wanted it to be perfect.”

It has been over two weeks since the incident and the outrage is fading away, but are her fans still dedicated to her music?

“She has to redeem herself, but I think people will still root for her if they are true fans,” Sedin said.

Students vary in their opinions whether Beyoncé’s lip-syncing was ethical or not.

“True artists can learn to balance lip-syncing, it happens in performances,” Sedin said. “I’ve been to Britney Spears concerts where they just play the track and she dances around. Compared to that what Beyoncé did wasn’t a big deal.”

Beyoncé can sing, there is no arguing that. She made a mistake, but who is perfect? Students agree that what she did was disappointing, but across the board there is still hope for Beyoncé.

About Stephanie Black

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