Sport injuries take toll on both mind, body of college athlete

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By Christina Armstrong

Sports Editor

 

After an impact to her head, Katie Rumfola, senior and kineseology major goalkeeper soccer team, experienced her life change physically, mentally and spiritually.

The concussion Rumfola received last Sept. 27 caused a serious brain injury. She had to participate in neurotherapy over the summer and is currently undergoing physical therapy twice a week. She has experienced seizures, a stroke, as well as memory loss, all of which have prevented her from playing soccer for  almost an entire year.

A concussion will prevent any athlete from playing until she is able to pass a series of tests proving the symptoms and effects from the concussion are gone. Symptoms include  memory loss, migraines, sensitivity to light and an intense urge to fall asleep.

Rumfola was not only affected athletically through this concussion but also academically. She is not always able to remember items promptly when she wakes up; morning classes were a struggle because she could not recall the material. She would have to wake up a few hours earlier than required in order to start preparing to remember for class, she said.

“I try to be an example to the rest of the team,” Rumfola said. “I work out and do physical therapy during practice. I want them to see that the circumstances don’t matter, and you can still work hard and trust God through them.”

Instead of focusing on her setbacks, Rumfola chooses to be an example on the women’s soccer team.

Academically, Rumfola puts in extra hours to prepare for exams because of her will to succeed despite her injury.

Through this time, Rumfola said she has sought out God and has learned to trust him. She is thankful for the support from her family.

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