FDA plans ban on trans-fat

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Microwave popcorn, frozen pizza, refrigerated cookie dough and coffee creamer are all items that can be found in the kitchens of college students for convenience, but coming this new year they will be modified with the removal of trans fat.

Trans-fat is considered unhealthy because of the effects it has on the body. It can cause health problems such as heart disease and diabetes. The Food and Drug Administration is taking actions to reduce the intake of trans fats by mandating the removal of hydrogenated oils from most food.

According to the FDA, the removal of trans-fat could prevent a potential 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths a year.

Adam James, personal trainer at the California Baptist University Recreation Center, explains why trans-fat strips food of their nutritional value.

“Trans-fat lowers high-density lipoprotein, which is good cholesterol, and raises low-density lipoprotein, which is the bad cholesterol,” James said. “Trans-fat also elevates the risk of heart disease.”

Trans-fat is used to improve the texture, shelf life and flavor of foods.

The ban on trans-fat will bring change across the United States. The FDA plans to end the use of partially hydrogenated oils, which are the prime source of trans-fat. These changes by the FDA will take place in January 2014.

Changes at California Baptist University have already taken place.

Brad Martin, executive chef at Provider, ex plains that trans-fat has already been removed from the food at CBU.

“Provider jumped ahead of the curve and took out trans fat and we do not use any oils that have trans-fat,” Martin said. “We took the proactive march as a company before  the ban became nationwide.”

Products favored among students will not necessarily be taken off the dinner menu, but will be modified to no longer contain hydrogenated oils.

About Ashley Dinkel

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