Service component in classes equips to serve

The “Core 4” student learning outcomes are clear goals for professors and students alike to gauge the application and importance of a course.

There is no doubt that faculty and staff at CBU understand the importance of layering education with the word of God and expansion of the kingdom.

Each academic program at CBU, more so the professional majors that equip students for a specific career path, have a more evident “equipped to serve” component.

All majors on campus are able to give students the opportunity to apply what they learn in their program directly into their respective career fields.

“Equipped to serve” has two major focuses: transferring students to a profession and the workplace and implementing a personal and social ethic that results in information participation in multiple levels of the community.

Academic programs university-wide are staying true to the “Core 4” and are incorporating the service component into the core curricula of academic programs.

Serving through class assignments is both beneficial for the community and makes the assignment seem much more worthwhile.

Graphic design students have class assignments to design logos for local startup companies.

Engineering students work on capstone projects that range from a water filtration system to an efficient aeronautical fuel barrel lift system for nonprofit organizations.

Communication arts students have been applying their skills in social media and public relations by serving as interns for businesses through the Riverside Downtown Partnership.

Liberal studies students volunteer in classrooms and assist teachers in grading and classroom activities.

Many more programs do wonderful things for the community, and that is something for which this university should be extremely proud.

Although we do appreciate these solutions for our hunger to serve, I would like to see students taking the initiative and applying their newly learned skill sets in bettering the community around us.

More times than not, I see students who only squeeze by and only do the minimum.

This not only acts as a training ground for students but it also benefits the community.

About Matthew Swope

Managing Editor

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