Sexual assault education should gear toward men

The campaigns, ads and commercials with the intent on teaching women how to “avoid getting raped” needs to come to an end.

Why is society consuming women’s minds with the belief that they must align their behavior in a certain way to prevent them from being sexually assaulted?

When entering into womanhood and being allowed more freedom, I remember being reminded that there were things I could not
do that men could. “Don’t stay out too late,” “Don’t walk alone,” and my most favorite line of them all, “Watch how you dress when you go out.”

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported in 2012 that one in five women has been raped in her lifetime. We need more campaigns with the intent of teaching young men how to respect women. Women should never have to question themselves and wonder what they could have done differently to avoid the attack.

Sixty eight percent of sexual assault crimes are left unreported, according to Rainn.org, the nation’s largest anti-sexual assault organization, making rape one of the most underreported crimes.

Pop culture has created this image of the rapist being a “stranger that sneaks up behind you when you’re walking home,” when, in reality, this is not always the case.

Women need to be educated and reminded that rape is rape, whether perpetrated by a friend or someone with whom you’re in a relationship. If you say “no” it means “no.”

Let’s turn the finger of guilt from the women who stayed out too late or dressed inappropriately back to the predator who attacked her. Let’s stop holding woman accountable for preventing rape. Let’s stop glorifying “victim blaming” and teach young men that sexual assault is never an option.

About Krysta Hawkins

Staff Writer

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