Campus expansions prompt temporary water shutdowns

Students and faculty at California Baptist University may recall receiving multiple email notifications sent about water being shut down in certain parts of campus this semester.

John Von Pertz, assistant director of Maintenance and Operations at CBU, explained why these frequent water shutdowns have been occurring, which include the fact that the campus is continuously growing in size.

“The age of the campus is another consideration,” he said. “First, buildings were built in the 1920s, all the way to today. CBU is (also) constructing the event center.”

Because of the buildings and new construction on campus, more water is consistently required to maintain the ever-growing campus.

Pertz also mentioned the campus is never closed, even during breaks and holiday seasons where there are still people living on campus with on-going events and staff and faculty working.

Because of this, Pertz said Facilities and Planning Services tries to schedule water shutdowns to conserve water and for building or landscaping and maintenance.

There have been more recent water shutdowns, such as the shutdown Feb. 9, which was done to make repairs to a faucet in the James Building.

Sara Stowe, sophomore psychology major, regularly has classes in the James Building, including when the shut-down occurred.

“The water shut downs didn’t necessarily bother me that much,” Stowe said. “However, I can see how it could bother other students.”

Pertz mentioned Facilities and Planning Services makes sure to schedule water shutdowns for dates and times that will inconvenience the least amount of students or events as possible, and inform students via email notifications ahead of time.

Stowe also said she can understand how the shut downs may be necessary for maintenance purposes.

Aside from the more recent water shut downs, Pertz also explained emergency shutdowns are also why water shutdowns may take place in the future.

“There are also emergency water shut downs and these we also try our best to schedule by giving a 24-hour notice,” Pertz said. “These type of repairs are leaks or equipment repairs that can be controlled until notice is given. Then there are also the urgent water shut downs. These are items that could be causing damage, risk of flooding or significant water loss. On these we will send out notice while the water is being secured and repairs are underway.”

About Davida Brenda

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