Beauty found in modifications

I know I am not alone when it comes to being a little insecure about my appearance. In an age of beautiful, perfectly photoshopped celebrities, it can be intimidating to be fully aware of your own personal blemishes or body oddities. I am my own worst critic and judge myself too harshly.

The beauty of society today is that we have the ability to change those things and be accepting of those who choose to go down that path. There is a pretty negative stigma surrounding plastic surgery — especially in the Christian community — and I think it is unfair to so harshly judge those who seek elective surgeries.

Like anything else, there can be excess. The decision to modify your body is not one that should be made on a whim and takes careful consideration. This is your body we are talking about, but at the same time, do not feel as though you should be ashamed of considering that nose job.

I think people assume going under the knife is a sign that someone is trying to please society by changing their body.

I have seen people cringe and roll their eyes when I brought up the possibility of having something done myself. A friend of mine told me I am beautiful the way I am and that she likes my unique features — that anyone who tells me to change them is ridiculous.

I do not disagree with her, but that is because if I did elect to change something, it would be for me and not for anyone else. I am a firm believer that if someone wants a chin implant, as long as they are not doing it for anyone else, then by all means, go for it.

There is a beautiful movement that has risen up, promoting people to love their bodies and really pushing for acceptance of physical appearance. This also includes the right to love your body even if it might be a little plastic.

Someone once suggested to me that people who dislike something about their body enough to surgically change it have something wrong with them mentally. At this point, I was the one cringing and rolling my eyes at them.

People who have plastic surgery often report feeling empowered by their changes, and that is a beautiful thing. We should promote positive feelings toward people who elect to have these types of surgical procedures and understand that finding inner peace and happiness is not always the same for each person.

About Chloe Tokar

Managing Editor

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