Students reflect on Black Friday ethics

With the Thanksgiving holiday coming up are many things on people’s minds, one of them being Black Friday, the chaotic event characterized by extreme sales and even more extreme crowds.

The event in which stores give deals and cut down on prices the day after Thanksgiving gives people the chance at products like a limited edition Nintendo 3DS for $99.99 or save up to $250 on a new computer.

People have killed for these deals in the past. According to the morbidly-themed blackfridaydeathcount.com seven people have died and 98 people have been injured since 2006.

Over the years, stores have been opening earlier and earlier with some starting their sales as early as Thanksgiving Day.

“I think it’s a little ridiculous there are stores that make (employees) come in on the day of Thanksgiving when it’s a day centered around being thankful and a time to be spending with family,” said Madison Haugland, sophomore English major. “I also find it hypocritical the day before we’re celebrating being with family and what we have and then the very next day we’re buying a bunch of stuff we probably don’t even need.”

Many students seem to agree with Haugland and find Black Friday to be chaotic, hypocritical and pointless in which to take part.

“I don’t think Black Friday is worth the crowds, the long lines and the chaos just to try to save a few bucks,” said Stanyan Buckingham, senior liberal arts major. “There are cyber opportunities that are a better than getting up early and just standing around in line.”

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