Numbers on scale do not represent overall health

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“I need to lose weight” is a phrase commonly said by people after they step on a scale and see the numbers that appear in front of them.

With the holidays fast approaching, some may feel the need to restrict themselves from eating his or her favorite foods out of fear of their weight increasing.

Kiley Jackson, junior worship arts major, said weighing herself can be nerve-racking.

“I try to hold myself to a certain standard and don’t let myself go above that,” Jackson said. “Sometimes, that can stress me out but I try to not worry too much.”

Davis Casciola, personal trainer at 24 Hour Fitness in Riverside, said a person’s weight can be deceptive and what truly matters is the ratio of muscle to fat, known as body composition.

“Weight gives a person an idea about their health but does not necessarily reveal the whole truth,” Casciola said. “Someone who weighs more may have a high-muscle to low-fat ratio. Muscle is heavier than body fat; that’s why we need to look at body composition.”

Casciola said people should remember weight fluctuates and depends on a variety of factors. Water and sodium intake, as well as the time a person ate or weighed himself or herself can cause the numbers on the scale to shift.

“There are plenty of other things to look at for progress other than the scale, such as measurements, (the) mirror and reps, Casciola said.

Andrew Whatley, junior international business major, said he is training for  a bodybuilding competition and that he must bulk up to reach his fitness goals.

“I am tracking my weight in hopes of hitting 200 pounds this summer, in order to cut down to compete next summer,” Whatley said.

Whatley said during the holiday season he plans on treating himself when he goes back home so he can put on more weight.

“With being here on campus and what my goals are it’s hard mentally (on a meal plan.”)

Casciola said people should enjoy food during the holidays.

“I have a saying: ‘One salad doesn’t make you lean and one pizza doesn’t make you fat,’” Casciola said. “It’s all about consistency; what you do and eat the majority of the time is what will be reflected in your body.”

By eating well, working out and taking the numbers on the scale lightly, one can enjoy the holidays and all the foods it has to offer while remaining healthy.

About Krista Abrahmsen

Sports Editor

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