How to prepare for finals using on-campus resources

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As the academic year comes to an end, final exams are just around the corner and students’ stress levels are rising.

Being a college student while attempting to manage a social life can become a hindrance to one’s academics. Lack of sleep, long study hours, excessive food intake and mere frustration are part of a common cycle during the most demanding time of the semester.

Various upperclassmen students at California Baptist University have faced several years of this intense pressure and have learned a few tricks of their own to cope with it.

Sake Gaitan, senior communication disorders major, said in all her years of facing the dreadful end of finals week, trial and error have aided her test preparation and anxiety levels.

“I’ve learned to simply pace myself because I have seen how students, like myself, tend to procrastinate when studying for finals,” Gaitan said. “Eventually, everyone acknowledges what works best for him or her and in my case, music and sleep help me stay focused.”

Numerous students tend to procrastinate their studying sessions, final papers and end-of-the-year projects, which can cause more chaos in their everyday lives. Learning to properly coordinate a hectic schedule can create a positive atmosphere and a more enjoyable college experience.

Alyssa Torres, junior accounting major, said she has always procrastinated studying for finals and found that it has created more tension and an emotional strain on her academic and personal life.

“After the first couple of semesters, I learned that studying regularly, finding help and getting enough sleep has positive side effects on my school work,” Torres said. “I also get ‘hangry’ when I don’t eat and going into an exam angry will only hurt you.”

CBU faculty make it their  goal to assist students in coping with the burden of finals by avoiding typical stress-inducers. There is a variety of on-campus locations, such as the Office of Student Success, Academic Success Center and the Counseling Center, that offer studying, spiritual and mental health guidance.

Sheri Torelli, department secretary for the Office of Student Success, said studying in smaller periods of time can be beneficial when having to remember an extensive amount of information. To accomplish this, students should stick to a calendar study time.

“Make good use of the Academic Success Center for tutoring and you can make appointments or use the walk-in hours,” Torelli said. “Remember to have a study schedule so that you study smarter, not harder, and then stick to that schedule.”

Finding the desired coping methods when dealing with final exams can be physically and mentally rewarding. In such a chaotic and challenging time in a young adult’s life, reducing stress and anxiety levels will further their academic careers. 

With the semester winding down, students should take the opportunity to seek for guidance and counseling.  Staff members at the OSS, located at Lancer Arms 54, are willing to provide beneficial advice. 

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