‘Fair Pay’ bill becomes law

Courtesy of Freepnglogos

Athletics at California Baptist University is one of many universities that could be affected by SB 206, the “Fair Pay to Play Act,” signed Sept. 30 by Gov. Gavin Newsom. 

The bill will allow college athletes to hire agents and receive endorsements contradicting current NCAA rules, which prohibit student-athletes from using their name, image and likeness as a student-athlete to make money. This law will activate on Jan. 1, 2023.

CBU Athletics said in an official statement that the SB 206 has brought attention to the topic of name, image and likeness, and an NCAA working group is expected to report its recommendations later this fall.

“The law doesn’t take effect until 2023 and there is a lot that could happen between now and then,” said Dr. Micah Parker, director of CBU Athletics.

In an issued statement, the NCAA said this new law is already creating confusion for current and future student-athletes, coaches, administrators and campuses in and outside of California.

“It’s early in the process for anybody to fully understand the impact and the unintended consequences of the new law,” said Mike Minyard, associate athletic director for external relations for CBU Athletics.

As a membership organization, the NCAA agreed changes need to be made for them to continue supporting student-athletes, but it should be done on a national level through the NCAA’s rule-making process. 

California is the first state to pass a bill regarding college athletes, and Minyard said other states will likely introduce similar bills.

“The situation will continue to evolve as the other states introduce similar bills, as well as the potential for a federal law proposal being developed,” Minyard said.

Jonathan Cadenhead, junior film major, said student-athletes put a lot of work into what they do. 

“Part of the only stigma that came and disallows them to make money (through their name and likeness) is because they are young,” Cadenhead said. “Nowadays being young is not really a standpoint to not make money.”

Cadenhead also said if student-athletes are allowed to get paid for the use of their name, he believes corporations will be more likely to get involved in college sports and sponsor student-athletes. 

Minyard said CBU Athletics is currently evaluating the situation and will not be taking immediate action in response to the “Fair Pay to Play Act.”

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