Students stay busy at home during COVID-19 quarantine

Hayden Schuljak | Banner | Nolan Martin a GCU graduate in Finance and Economics, and Sawyer Schuljak a current 2nd year medical school student, practice safe social distancing with a game of ping pong while Ari, a canary mastiff, restraints herself from eating the ball.

Amid stay-at-home orders to curb the COVID-19 pandemic, it can be hard for students to stay busy at home. With California Baptist University’s campus closed and classes moved online, staying productive and filling long, unstructured days can be more difficult than it seems. Students can still help encourage one another even from the confines of their homes.

Alina Jungklaus, junior psychology major, lives in Wurzburg, Germany. Since returning home, Jungklaus said she has spent her days going on walks and taking pictures of her hometown with her camera. Regular semesters are so busy for her, Jungklaus said she has found more time to read and has gotten back into drawing and painting.

Jungklaus said she recommends students to take advantage of this unexpected time with family. Many students on campus live far from home and do not have the chance to see family often.

“It’s great to have them around all the time; I appreciate that,” Jungklaus said. “Also, reflect on this year and what happened so far. Focus on your mental health and spiritual growth. Now is the time to lean on God and rejoice.”

Lauren Elkins, senior film major, is from Tuscon, Ariz. Since returning home, Elkins said she has stayed productive by taking walks every day and going on drives with the windows down and the music up. Elkins also said she has been painting and learning to play the ukulele, and she makes sure to stay in touch with her friends via FaceTime.

“This is an important time because usually when God seems to be quiet, it’s because he wants you to listen,” Elkins said. “So if he is making the entire world quiet, maybe it’s because he has something important he wants to tell us.”

Shekiah Warner, junior intercultural studies major, is from Friant, Calif. Since returning home, Warner said she has been taking walks around her neighborhood and the surrounding fields. For Warner, doing this helps show her the beauty God has created and inspires her creativity. She also encourages fellow students not to waste this time given to them; going for walks, exercising and finding inspiring ways to be creative can help.

“It might be scary, it might be lonely, it might even be boring, but it is full of opportunity,” Warner said. “God has provided us with an opportunity to continue learning, to still deepen friendships and to have unprecedented time. Being grateful for this season makes it a bit more ideal, a lot less scary, a little less lonely and far from boring.”

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