Voices of young-voters should still be amplified and used

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Going into the 2020 election, it is important now more than ever that young adults understand how vital their voices really are.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 2018 only 53% of the eligible voting population voted during the midterm election. Adults from 18-25 years old make up half of the eligible voting population. However, the young adult vote still remains to be one of the lowest voter turnouts.

It can often feel like this generation’s opinions are often suppressed or looked down on by older generations.

Despite the criticism, It is important to know that our votes will set the precedent for future generations. How we vote and what we vote on will determine what life looks like for those younger than us.

You can make your voice heard by staying informed on current events, striking up conversations with people about political topics and learning and ask questions.

Participating in elections is a great way to exercise your rights as an American citizen. Regardless of who you support, voting is a civic duty.

People say, “Create the world you want for your children” or “Build a better tomorrow.” However, that cannot be done without using our voices and votes to impact the world. The same issues discussed on social media should be considered when voting.

Social media can also be a great way to amplify the voices of those who either cannot vote or have smaller platforms. In dealing with social media, it is also vital that we do not take everything we read as the truth or promote fake news. The best way to avoid doing this is to do research and fact check what you read before you share.

While using social media as a platform for advocacy and policy change is a great first step in reaching other young adults, it cannot be all that we do. If young adults do not vote to change the policies they are posting about, then when will the real change begin?

According to USA Today, young adult voter turnout rose 20 or more percentage points in California between the 2014 and 2018 election.

Even with the impressive raise, it only put the percentage of voting young adults at 36 percent. The other 64 percent of voters is made up of ages 30-65 years or older. The largest voting population is ages 65 years and older, despite the young adult vote making up a larger percentage of voters.

Voting in the 2020 presidential election will be a huge determining factor in how the future plays out, regardless of political party. You may not care who ends up being president in November, but you might feel differently in few years when the action is irreversible.

Educate yourself on important political topics before voting to ensure that your vote is reflective of your opinion and not the views of others.

The first step in getting ready to vote is to register to vote or check your voter status if it has been a while since you registered. Checking your voter status ensures that all your information is correct, so come election day you will be ready to go.

If you are a new voter, the last day to register to vote in California is Oct. 19. You can use www.vote.org to register to vote or check your voter status online.

Once you have registered, there are a few options for how you can vote.

The first is voting by mail, after receiving your ballot by mail, fill it out and mail it in to be counted. The second option is to receive your ballot by mail, fill it out and drop it off at a local polling place to be counted. Third, you can go to a local polling place and vote in person.

All California registered voters will be mailed a ballot up to 29 days prior to Nov. 3, Election Day.

With the 2020 presidential election coming up, young adults must sign up and show up on election day

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