Trump and Biden confirmed at conventions

Courtesy of Shutterstock

With the nation still struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic, both the Democratic and Republican National Conventions were heavily modified with many in-person events canceled and the amount of in-person attendees drastically reduced. Both conventions however were streamed online and broadcast through national television stations.

Democratic National Convention:

The Democratic National Convention ran from Aug. 17-20 and featured important speakers such as former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama; Senators Amy Klobuchar, Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and former first lady Michelle Obama. Speakers gave their thoughts on the state of the nation, comments on the current administration and why they believed former Vice President Joe Biden was the answer to the problems currently facing Americans. The four-day convention ended with Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) accepting their nominations as the Democratic candidates for president and vice president of the United States.

During his acceptance speech, Biden laid out a few key things he hopes to accomplish if elected president. These include ensuring equal pay for women, working on climate change, creating a healthcare system that lowers health care premiums, deductibles and drug prices, building infrastructure with roads, airports, highways and broadband and bringing five million manufacturing and technology jobs to the United States.

“It’s time for us — for we the people — to come together,” Biden said during his acceptance speech. “I am a proud Democrat, and I will be proud to carry the banner of our party into the general election. So, it is with great honor and humility that I accept this nomination for President of the United States of America. But while I will be a Democratic candidate, I will be an American president. I will work as hard for those who did not support me as I will for those who did. That is the job of a president. To represent all of us, not just our base or our party. This is not a partisan moment. This must be an American moment.”

Republican National Convention:

The Republican National Convention saw the nomination of President Donald J. Trump and Vice President Mike Pence as the presidential and vice-presidential candidates on behalf of the Republican Party.

The convention, which was held Aug. 24-27, focused on the accomplishments of the current administration in the past four years and laid out some key things the administration hoped to accomplish in the next four years. Some of these aspirations include banning sanctuary cities; hiring more law enforcement officers and increasing penalties for assaulting law enforcement officers; ensuring justice for every citizen regardless of race, religion and creed; creating 10 million jobs in the next 10 months and ending American reliance on China. The president also promised to protect Medicare and Social Security, expand charter schools and provide school choice to every American family, require medical price transparency and lower the cost of prescription drugs.

“My fellow Americans, tonight, with a heart full of gratitude and boundless optimism, I proudly accept this nomination for President of the United States,” Trump said in his acceptance speech. “The Republican Party, the party of Abraham Lincoln, goes forward united, determined and ready to welcome millions of Democrats, independents and anyone who believes in the greatness of America and the righteous heart of the American People … What united generations past was an unshakable confidence in America’s destiny, and an unbreakable faith in the American People. They knew that our country is blessed by God and has a special purpose in this world. It is that conviction that inspired the formation of our union, our westward expansion, the abolition of slavery, the passage of civil rights, the space program, and the overthrow of fascism, tyranny and communism.”

Both candidates are now on the campaign trail. The first presidential debate will be held Sept. 29, at 6 p.m. Pacific Standard Time.

About Misty Severi

Staff Writer

Leave a Reply