Engineering students create profound device

[Eugene Achim | Banner]
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California Baptist University biomedical engineering students are focusing their senior capstone project on a device that can revolutionize childbirth through reducing the cesarean section rate and injury to both the mother and infant.

Adam Goodwin, Wyatt Deane, Joel Pittman and Ruthie Muqatach, senior biomedical engineering majors, have figured out an alternative for assisting women during birth.

Goodwin explained how the device acts as a band and wraps around the mother’s abdomen. It will sense when the uterus has contractions and simultaneously contract with the uterus.
“The Exit,” which is what Goodwin and his team call themselves, are aware there are clinical devices that help women through labor, like forceps, which are tweezers used to clench onto the infant’s head and slowly remove the fetus from the uterus.

“Forceps when used properly are effective,” Goodwin said. “When not used properly, it is defective.”

Deane said their device would be used later in the birthing process, because most difficulties arise when labor is longer than expected.

With countless hours going into this project, Goodwin and his team are highly confident in this device and the effect it can have in the medical world.

“The potential for this can be huge, but we need the money to prolong this project,” Deane said. Next summer, “The Exit” will attend a conference that showcases capstone projects for undergraduate students.

“Although this is a group project, each individual has been given a role to build and complete the device,” Muqatach said.

With one semester left between graduation and the conference, “The Exit” will continue to build, alter and design their project with hopes to make an impact at the convention, in the lives of soon-to-be mothers  and in the world’s medical field.

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